Arche

2005-09-24

in Daily updates, Oxford

Milan Ilnyckyj laser mapped

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

WikiMan June 10, 2007 at 7:23 pm

In the ancient Greek philosophy, arche (ἀρχή) is the beginning or the first principle of the world.

The idea of an arche was first philosophized by Thales of Miletus, who claimed that the first principle of all things is water. His theory was supported by the observation of moisture throughout the world and coincided with his theory that the earth floated on water.

Mike Kushnir July 2, 2007 at 5:53 pm

welcome back home, milan.

Milan July 2, 2007 at 11:12 pm

Mike,

Thanks.

. April 29, 2010 at 9:19 pm

The University of Oxford is first mentioned in 12th century records. As the University took shape, friction between the hundreds of students living where and how they pleased led to a decree that all undergraduates would have to reside in approved halls. Of the hundreds of Aularian houses that sprang up across the city, only St Edmund Hall (c 1225) remains. What put an end to the halls was the emergence of colleges. Oxford’s earliest colleges were University College (1249), Balliol (1263) and Merton (1264). These colleges were established at a time when Europeans were starting to translate the writings of Greek philosophers. These writings challenged European ideology – inspiring scientific discoveries and advancements in the arts – as society began seeing itself in a new way. These colleges at Oxford were supported by the Church in hopes to reconcile Greek Philosophy and Christian Theology. The relationship between “town and gown” has often been uneasy — as many as 93 students and townspeople were killed in the St Scholastica Day Riot of 1355.

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