Economics

The truth is almost certainly that we're in for decades, perhaps centuries, of upheaval—of often rapid shifts in our climate, ecosystems, economy, societies, technologies, and geopolitics. There is no "there" to get to on the other side of a transition. 3/ — Alex Steffen (@AlexSteffen) July 20, 2018

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I got an email from Greyhound which confirmed recent headlines: We are permanently cancelling all Greyhound Canada services in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. In British Columbia, we are cancelling all services as well. This is a shame both for me personally and in general. It means the train is now the only […]

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Two main examples of new western nuclear plant designs are the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR, discussed earlier) and the Westinghouse AP1000. All efforts to install either are way over budget and behind schedule in the United States and Europe. China just opened one of each on successive days at the end of June.

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Universal mail services are interesting to consider, both in terms of the relationship between universal social needs and the government provision of services and because of how they illustrate connections between public policy and technology. It’s important to define what I mean, because it’s distinct from the broader category of delivery services, which are provided […]

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Canada’s continued enthusiasm for new fossil fuel production not only helps undermine the world’s chances of dealing with climate change, but it also threatens Canada’s future economic prosperity as one of the dirtiest and highest-cost producers of a commodity that may see sharply declining demand. A recent special report in The Economist said: Yet the […]

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Yesterday I photographed two rallies outside Toronto-area offices of Members of Parliament and Ministers of Finance and Foreign Affairs Bill Morneau and Chrystia Freeland. With Freeland we asked if Canada was now going to withdraw our signature from the Paris Agreement. The sentiment was crafted to be possible to express in one photograph, but the […]

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Writing in The Globe and Mail Thomas Homer-Dixon and Yonatan Strauch have a solid explanation for the incompatibility between the Trans Mountain pipeline and the climate commitments Canada has chosen for itself: For these [pipeline] opponents, further massive investment in the extraction and export of some of the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel on Earth is […]

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When it comes to stopping unsustainable fossil fuel development, anything that creates investor uncertainty can be useful. By that metric, the British Columbia government’s announcement of a diluted bitumen shipment expansion moratorium while it studies how a diluted bitumen spill would unfold is a small contribution to shifting Canada to an acceptable development pathway. Still, […]

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Reporting on the Credit Suisse Research Institute’s global wealth report, The Economist explains: If the world’s wealth were divided equally, each household would have $56,540. Instead, the top 1% own more than half of all global wealth. The median wealth per household is just $3,582; if you own more than that, you are in the […]

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Some earlier comments discussed the Site C dam project in B.C. Today, B.C.’s NDP government committed to finishing the $10.7 billion project. Like the Muskrat Falls project in Labrador, this is a multi-billion dollar project facing extensive criticism from environmentalists and Indigenous people. On the one hand, it is desirable to get as much low […]

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