Economics

As reported in The Guardian, the International Energy Agency is warning the world that there is no place for new fossil fuel power stations, vehicles, and industrial facilities if the world is going to stay below the 2 ˚C upper limit in the Paris Agreement: In total, the IEA calculated that existing infrastructure would “lock […]

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In an ideal world, politicians would rely on high quality sources of information to determine what they should consider to be true factually about the world. They could then apply their political philosophies and ideologies to the question of what public policy ought to exist. It’s not only conservatives who invert or pervert this process, […]

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I have said before that only multilateral negotiation can address climate change. Today The Guardian has one proposal: We need a fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty – and we need it now. The article argues: A new line in the sand is needed to underpin the existing climate agreement, to exert influence over the immediate choices […]

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Tzeporah Berman’s comments to the Alberta Teachers Association are well worth reading. She highlights how Canada keeps operating with an outdated notion of how usable and competitive the bitumen sands are, and that the case for new pipelines collapses when you consider what the world as a whole needs to do to address climate change. […]

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Canadians (and especially Canadian politicians) seem to often work from the assumption that so much has been spent on developing Alberta’s oil sands that Canada is now committed to continuing with the project. There are many problems with the argument. Particularly when it comes to new investments, it could be seen as a case of […]

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There’s another dire warning from the IPCC: Final call to save the world from ‘climate catastrophe’ There seems little reason to hope that people will react differently to this one than to the 1990, 1996, 2001, 2007, and 2014 reports. Our collective future is a massive ethical blindspot. People who wouldn’t think about missing a […]

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A carbon tax is a liberty-respecting, economically efficient mechanism to help address the threat of climate change and build a sustainable, prosperous society. It ought to be welcomed and supported by policy-savvy fair-minded conservatives who want to live up to their ideals while stewarding the integrity of the planet for future generations. Meanwhile in Canada: […]

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Steve Paikin’s show on TVO is a video equivalent to CBC’s The Current, in that they both tackle matters of going political importance, tend to get into the substantive matters involved, and feature hosts that press guests to go beyond sound bites. The recent segment with author Chris Hedges on American decline – “The Collapse […]

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Both in the literature on fossil fuel divestment and when speaking with divestment activists the concept or worldview of “climate justice” is prominent. A good example is Jessica Grady-Benson and Brinda Sarathy’s paper “Fossil fuel divestment in US higher education: student-led organising for climate justice“. They contend that climate change is increasingly seen as a […]

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One frequent talking point from people who see no problem with continuing to enlarge the bitumen sands is that action by countries like Canada is pointless as long as larger places like India and China continue to build large amounts of coal capacity. The Economist recently reported (in an issue with a cover story about […]

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