M’s PL, XII

2007-08-13

in Geek stuff, Security

(220), (210), (241), (310), (250)
(350), (380), (317), (271), (346)
(222+1), (212), (302), (258), (280)
(127), (100), (556), (452+1), (599)
(621), (633), (590), (392), (387)
(414), (423), (539), (572), (157)
(142), (128), (189), (529+2), (412)
(361+1), (351), (200), (229), (174)
(409), (440), (594), (532), (539)
(608), (259+1), (310), (271), (100)
(143), (98), (478), (530), (599)
(369+1), (343), (321), (370), (375)
(389), (413), (530), (58), (79)
(33), (87), (211+1), (251), (346)
(556), (608), (631), (640), (546)
(579), (549), (492), (481), (429)
(336), (387), (442+1), (219), (213)
(439), (450), (551), (632), (245)
(396+1), (589), (539), (418), (499)
(422), (460+2)

Hint: second Beale cipher.

Report a typo or inaccuracy

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Milan August 13, 2007 at 1:42 am

Here is something easier, for the frustrated.

Tom August 13, 2007 at 2:13 am

Perhaps a Sunday cipher should become a regular feature. With prizes?

(205) August 13, 2007 at 1:18 pm

(136), (154), (245), (383), (333)
(286+2), (297), (156), (171), (161)
(549), (645), (17)

Verena August 13, 2007 at 2:18 pm

I am one of the frustrated… I cannot solve the easier one either, because I do not know what it is??? Is it some sort of code cracking or someting with mathematics?

Milan August 13, 2007 at 2:25 pm

Verena,

These are relatively simple cryptographic challenges. You use the clues to decode the text. Then, to prove that you figured it out, you write a response in the same code

For example, you might see a message like:

HTSISIVAREYMILPCEPIHER

To decipher it, you need to switch the order of each successive pair of letters. Then it give the plaintext:

THISISAVERYSIMPLECIPHER

To prove that you figured it out, you could write:

HTTAAWTSOOAEYS

In terms of figuring out what the clues mean, Google is your friend.

Milan August 13, 2007 at 2:26 pm

You may find this information helpful.

Litty August 13, 2007 at 6:13 pm

What’s the story behind the smattering of plus one’s and plus two’s?

Why write (211+1) instead of (212)?

Litty August 13, 2007 at 6:23 pm

These Beale ciphers seem decidedly fishy.

Milan August 13, 2007 at 7:01 pm

Why write (211+1) instead of (212)?

Because the numbers before and after the addition sign represent different things.

Anon August 27, 2008 at 6:27 pm

The second Beale Cipher is a type of book cipher, so we can assume the scheme above is the same. “M’s PL, XII” is most plausibly Milton’s Paraside Lost, book 12.

The numbers probably correspond to lines in the book: either the first words or the first letters. The (X+1) entries may be a way of dealing with rare letters.

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